Type and Anatomical Site of Self-Reported Injuries

 
V.A.3
 

Lead Author(s): 

Jaimo Ahn, MD, PhD, FACS
Arvind D Nana, MD
Gudrun Mirick, MD
Anna N Miller, MD, FACS

Supporting Author(s): 

Sylvia I Watkins-Castillo, PhD

The type of self-reported injury reported showed small variations by demographic group, particularly with respect to age and race/ethnicity. Overall, the most common type of musculoskeletal injury for which medical attention was sought was a sprain or strain (37%). This was particularly true for non-Hispanic blacks (42%) and non-Hispanic others (43%), and persons age 18 to 44 (43%). Persons age 65 and older were most likely to report a scrape or bruise (contusion) for which they sought medical attention (28%). Fractures were most common among those 18 and younger (27%). (Reference Table 5A.3.1 PDF CSV; Table 5A.3.2 PDF CSV; Table 5A.3.3 PDF CSV; Table 5A.3.4 PDF CSV)

Injuries to the lower extremity were the most common injury site, accounting for 45% of all musculoskeletal injuries for which medical attention was sought. Female individuals reported lower extremity injuries more than male (52% and 39% of all injuries, respectively) while 42% of injuries reported by male individuals were to the upper extremity. Persons age 18 to 64 years were most likely to have a back injury, but injuries to the neck/back/spine accounted for only 13% of reported injuries. Spine injuries were reported in the West region (19%) more than other regions. Race/ethnicity was not a factor is anatomic site of injuries for which medical attention was sought. (Reference Table 5A.3.1 PDF CSV; Table 5A.3.2 PDF CSV; Table 5A.3.3 PDF CSV; Table 5A.3.4 PDF CSV)

Sprains and strains accounted for 64% of injuries for which medical attention was sought when the neck/back/spine were involved, and 41% of lower extremity injuries. Scrapes and bruises accounted to 49% of torso injuries. Injuries to the upper extremity were distributed across all types of injuries. Fractures occurred more frequently from a fall, while sprains and strains were more common with vehicle or sport-related injuries. Cuts and other types of injuries occurred from other causes. (Reference Table 5A.4.1 PDF CSV; Table 5A.4.2 PDF CSV)

Just over 6% of self-reported medically-consulted musculoskeletal injuries resulted in hospitalization of one night or longer. Fractures were most likely to result in hospitalization (16%), with sprains and strains least likely (2%). Injuries to the torso were more likely to result in hospitalization (10%) than injuries to other anatomic sites. Injuries resulting from falls (10%) also had a greater likelihood of hospitalization. (Reference Table 5A.4.3 PDF CSV)

Edition: 

  • Fourth Edition

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